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Easy Pie Crust 1•2•3

Autumn is upon us, and there's no better time to learn just how easy it is to make perfect pie crust. ...and yes its as easy as 1 2 3! So lets get started.

Pie Crust - Easy as 1 • 2 • 3

What most people think is the hardest part of making a great pie is actually very easy - Pie Crust! Some people become polarized with frustration and questions as they look at there favorite pie recipe. Why does a pie need to have crust - There has to be an easier way. Well don’t sweat it. Pie crust is easy. Let me show you just how easy it is. The three steps are Measure, Mix, and Roll. That's it, it’s that easy.

Quick tip: we will be making an all butter crust. Make sure your butter, water, and surface are ice cold, I sometimes like to roll my pie crust out on a piece of cold marble, especially on warm days. Why do we need to make sure the butter is ice cold? Butter unlike shortening has a lower melting temperature and can become challenging to work with when warm, keeping your butter and water cold will help ease in the handling of your dough.

Lets get started...

1. Measure:
Measure all ingredients carefully - Here is what you need:
1 stick (4 ounces) cold unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch pieces - Freeze the butter pieces for at least 20 minutes.
4 tablespoons of cold water - Refrigerate the water until ready to use.
1¼ cups unbleached all-purpose flour - Learn all about flour here
1½ teaspoons sugar (omit for a savory crust)
¼ teaspoon salt

2. Mix:
Place the dry ingredients in the bowl of a food processor, Mixing bowl, or on mixing surface.

Processor:
Process briefly to blend. Add butter pieces and pulse in 1-second bursts until the butter and flour mixture looks like crushed crackers and peas. Sprinkle a tablespoon of cold water over the mixture. add additional 2 or 3 tablespoons one at a time. The dough is done when most of it holds together. <learn more about making dough in a Processor/Processors can be found here.

Mixer:
Beat on low briefly to blend. Add butter pieces slowly until the butter and flour mixture looks like crushed crackers and peas. Sprinkle a tablespoon of cold water over the mixture. add additional 2 or 3 tablespoons one at a time. The dough is done when most of it holds together <learn more about making dough with a Mixer/Mixers can be found here.

Surface:
use Pastry cutter to blend until the butter and flour mixture looks like crushed crackers and peas. Sprinkle a tablespoon of cold water over the mixture. add additional 2 or 3 tablespoons one at a time. The dough is done when most of it holds together <learn more about making dough on a Surface Recommended Rolling Surfaces can be found here.

Refrigerate:
If the dough feels very soft at this stage, refrigerate before continuing. If it feels cold and firm, continue to the next step.

Turn the dough onto a work surface and knead gently 3 to 6 times.

Flatten the dough into a 6- or 7-inch disk, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate for 30 minutes. This allows time for the dough to hydrate fully and for the butter to firm up again

3. Roll:
If the dough has been refrigerated for more than 30 minutes, it may be very firm and will crack if you try to roll it. Let it sit on the counter for 10 to 15 minutes. Dust your work surface and the top of the dough generously with flour. Roll, turning the dough, until you’ve got a 14- to 15-inch circle about 1/8 inch thick.

Place the dough carefully into the pan, lifting it slightly to ease it into the crevices of the pan. Do not stretch or pull the dough, which can cause breakage or shrinkage during baking.

rim the dough using a pair of kitchen scissors so it overhangs the edge of the pan by 1 inch. Fold the overhanging dough under itself around the pan edge, then crimp or form a decorative border. Chill for 30 minutes before baking.

The dough can be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated for up to 2 days, or double-wrapped in plastic and frozen for up to 1 month in a freezer bag.

That's it. Pie dough as easy as pie!

Learn more about making pies dough Tips and tricks to making great pie dough.